Big Hero 6 will forever be an essential film for me. Not only is it a fantastic contribution to the Disney catalogue of movies, but it's also the very first movie that we took our first born, Cohen, to see in a theatre. That's a big deal. You're first born child presents so many firsts to experience with them, so you try and make the most of the significant events because some of them are so hard to nail down. My son's first Christmas, for instance. He wasn't aware of what was going on because he was only about 4 months old. Even his 2nd Christmas was touch and go because he wasn't really aware of what all was going on. He knew he got to rip some stuff open, but there again it was sort of abstract for him. His 1st Birthday, too. He was 1 year old, he didn't get it. He didn't even smash his cake, he simply sat in his high-chair and sort of stared at everyone with a, "What is going on here" type of look in his face. 

So as you can tell, this film occupies a significant moment in the life of our first born. Which is why it's always really interesting to read about some of the creative work that went into producing a film like Big Hero 6. Maybe it's the comfort I get from knowing that the people who were working on it weren't just looking for a way to make a truck-ton of money; I believe there are people in the front office of Disney that do that after the film is done. But the filmmakers and the production team actually writing, animating, and producing the finished project seem to put a lot of time and thought into the film. It wasn't just a bunch of slapstick, but some heartfelt moments that go beyond just a funny little moment. The Baymax fist bump in the video leading this piece is a for instance. And, to further evidence the proof that there is heart behind the film, read this article from Entertainment Weekly about the creative process involved in bringing that fist bump to life and the ramifications it has for later in the film. My son, who is 3, legitimately laughed at that moment, and still giggles today when I try and reproduce it with him. Which is cool because I get to play Baymax's part. 

Taking your kids to their first cinematic experience though, that's something you can plan and plot out. For Cohen, he'd watched the Big Hero 6 previews and got excited whenever they came on the TV. So, we knew that this was the movie that we needed to take him to the theatre for the first time to see. And it was awesome. He did awesome, watched the whole movie. Ate popcorn. During the big battle at the end he was literally standing up fighting along with Hiro and Baymax (and without even bothering others around us). And, again, the movie is fantastic. He's hooked on Big Hero 6, specifically Baymax, and is getting some Big Hero 6 toys for Christmas. My friend recently visited Disney Land with his family and grabbed him one of the last Baymax dolls in the entire park. He even cooked up a little something special for my boy as well. 

As someone living and working in the creative arts, I love this sort of peak behind the curtain. Maybe it seems like I'm making a big deal out of something insignificant, but I would disagree. I'll remember for the rest of my days that Big Hero 6 was the first movie we took our first born child to see at a movie theatre. Every time I see that fist bump, I'll remember his reaction to seeing it. Whenever I now see people share a fist bump, I think of that scene, and I think of my son. That's a tender moment I like to relive. And, it's obvious from movie co-writer Robert Baird's own remarks at the end of the article that the scene has life beyond the screen.